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Feil Family Brain & Mind Research Institute

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Doctors Detail Unexpected Recoveries from Long-Term Coma After Cardiac Arrest

Neurologists traditionally have expected that patients who remain in coma after cardiac arrest have almost no chance of making a meaningful recovery if they fail to emerge from coma within a week. But a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and NYU Grossman School of Medicine neurologists suggests that a small but significant fraction of such patients can recover even after much longer periods of coma...

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African American Patients Have Higher Risk of Stroke Recurrence Compared with White Patients

The short-term risk of a second stroke following an initial minor stroke is roughly 60 percent higher for black patients compared with white patients, according to a study led by Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers.

In the study, published Feb. 24 in JAMA Neurology, the researchers re-analyzed the results of a stroke prevention trial conducted at 269 sites worldwide, including...

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Sex Differences in Susceptibility to Neurodegenerative Disease May Arise From Differences in Brain Immune Cells

Immune cell activity in the brain differs between males and females in ways that may explain why some neurodegenerative diseases affect the sexes differently, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists.

The study, published Dec. 23 in Nature Neuroscience, compared brain-resident immune cells called microglia in male and female mice. Microglia in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders...

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Brain Immune Cells, Neurodegeneration Differ in Males, Females

Immune cell activity in the brain differs between males and females in ways that may explain why some neurodegenerative diseases affect the sexes differently, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine scientists.

The study, published Dec. 23 in Nature Neuroscience, compared brain-resident immune cells called microglia in male and female mice. Microglia in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders...

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Scientists Build the First Global Database and Roadmap for CAR Therapy Clinical Trials

Weill Cornell Medicine scientists have built the first global database of clinical trials testing a rapidly expanding approach to cancer treatment that involves genetically modifying immune cells to recognize specific targets on a patient’s cancer cells and attack them. By analyzing the approach, called chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapies, the scientists designed a “therapeutic roadmap” that identifies all current therapies as well as additional cancers that can be treated with them....

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Dr. Costantino Iadecola Named Distinguished Scientist by the American Heart Association

Dr. Costantino Iadecola, director of the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute and the Anne Parrish Titzell Professor of Neurology at Weill Cornell Medicine, has been recognized as a 2019 Distinguished Scientist by the American Heart Association for his outstanding contributions to cardiovascular, stroke and dementia research.

The American Heart Association (AHA) honored Dr....

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A high-salt diet may negatively affect cognitive function

Faraco

Dr. Giuseppe Faraco publishes a paper titled, "Dietary salt promotes cognitive impairment through tau phosphorylation" in Nature, 2019 Oct 23. doi: 10.1038/s41586-019-1688-z.

“Our study proposes a new mechanism by which salt mediates cognitive impairment and also provides further evidence of a link between dietary habits and cognitive function,” This study finds that...

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High-Salt Diet Promotes Cognitive Impairment Through the Alzheimer-Linked Protein Tau

A high-salt diet may negatively affect cognitive function by causing a deficiency of the compound nitric oxide, which is vital for maintaining vascular health in the brain, according to a new study in mice from Weill Cornell Medicine researchers. When nitric oxide levels are too low, chemical changes to the protein tau occur in the brain, contributing to dementia.

In the...

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Racing Toward a Cure for Alzheimer’s Disease

In the roughly 100 years since Alois Alzheimer first described the devastating neurodegenerative disease that now bears his name, scientists have developed an increasingly sophisticated understanding of the brain. Yet as incidence of the disease continues to rise in an aging population, effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease remain elusive.

Leading experts in neurodegenerative disease gathered on Oct. 4 at the...

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Blame the Messenger? : Faulty Building Instructions for Brain Cells May Give Rise to Neurological and Psychiatric Conditions

By now there’s no question that genetics contributes to many brain diseases, including Alzheimer’s, autism and depression. But exactly how genetic malfunctions translate into disorders remains unclear, rendering cures elusive. Dr. Hagen Tilgner, an assistant professor of neuroscience in the Center for Neurogenetics of Weill Cornell Medicine’s Feil Family Brain and Mind...

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