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Progesterone receptor expression in Cajal-Retzius cells of the developing rat dentate gyrus: potential role in hippocampus-dependent memory.

TitleProgesterone receptor expression in Cajal-Retzius cells of the developing rat dentate gyrus: potential role in hippocampus-dependent memory.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsNewell AJ, Lalitsasivimol D, Willing J, Gonzales K, Waters EM, Milner TA, McEwen BS, Wagner CK
JournalJ Comp Neurol
Date Published2018 Aug 01
ISSN1096-9861
Abstract

The development of medial temporal lobe circuits is critical for subsequent learning and memory functions later in life. The present study reports the expression of progesterone receptor (PR), a powerful transcription factor of the nuclear steroid receptor superfamily, in Cajal-Retzius cells of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus of rats. PR was transiently expressed from the day of birth through postnatal day 21, but was absent thereafter. Although PR immunoreactive (PRir) cells did not clearly express typical markers of mature neurons, they possessed an ultrastructural morphology consistent with neurons. PRir cells did not express markers for GABAergic neurons, neuronal precursor cells, nor radial glia. However, virtually all PR cells co-expressed the calcium binding protein, calretinin, and the glycoprotein, reelin, both reliable markers for Cajal-Retzius neurons, a transient population of developmentally critical pioneer neurons that guide synaptogenesis of perforant path afferents and histogenesis of the dentate gyrus. Indeed, inhibition of PR activity during the first two weeks of life impaired adult performance on both the novel object recognition and object placement memory tasks, two behavioral tasks hypothesized to describe facets of episodic-like memory in rodents. These findings suggest that PR plays an unexplored and important role in the development of hippocampal circuitry and adult memory function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

DOI10.1002/cne.24485
Alternate JournalJ. Comp. Neurol.
PubMed ID30069875