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Ischemic Stroke After Emergency Department Discharge for Symptoms of Transient Neurological Attack.

TitleIschemic Stroke After Emergency Department Discharge for Symptoms of Transient Neurological Attack.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsParikh NS, Merkler AE, Kummer BR, Kamel H
JournalNeurohospitalist
Volume8
Issue3
Pagination135-140
Date Published2018 Jul
ISSN1941-8744
Abstract

Background and Purpose: The significance of transient neurological attack (TNA) symptoms is unclear. We sought to determine the risk of ischemic stroke after discharge from the emergency department (ED) with a diagnosis consistent with symptoms of TNA.

Methods: Using administrative claims data, we identified patients discharged from EDs in New York between 2006 and 2012 with a primary discharge diagnosis of a TNA symptom, defined as altered mental status, generalized weakness, and sensory changes. The primary outcome was ischemic stroke. We used Kaplan-Meier survival statistics to calculate cumulative rates, and Cox regression to compare stroke risk after TNA versus after transient ischemic attack (TIA; positive control) or renal colic (negative control) while adjusting for demographics and vascular risk factors.

Results: Of 499 369 patients diagnosed with a TNA symptom and discharged from the ED, 7756 were hospitalized for ischemic stroke over a period of 4.7 (±1.9) years. At 90 days, the cumulative stroke rate was 0.29% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.28%-0.31%) after TNA symptoms versus 2.08% (95% CI: 1.89%-2.28%) after TIA and 0.03% (95% CI: 0.02%-0.04%) after renal colic. The hazard ratio (HR) of stroke was higher after TNA than after renal colic (HR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.90-2.40) but significantly lower than after TIA (HR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.44-0.50). Compared to TIA, TNA was less strongly associated with stroke among patients under 60 years of age compared to those over 60.

Conclusions: Patients discharged from the ED with TNA symptoms faced a higher risk of ischemic stroke than patients with renal colic, but the magnitude of stroke risk was low, particularly compared to TIA.

DOI10.1177/1941874417750996
Alternate JournalNeurohospitalist
PubMed ID29977444
PubMed Central IDPMC6022908
Grant ListK23 NS082367 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
R01 NS097443 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States
T32 NS007153 / NS / NINDS NIH HHS / United States