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Estrogen receptors observed at extranuclear neuronal sites and in glia in the nucleus accumbens core and shell of the female rat: Evidence for localization to catecholaminergic and GABAergic neurons.

TitleEstrogen receptors observed at extranuclear neuronal sites and in glia in the nucleus accumbens core and shell of the female rat: Evidence for localization to catecholaminergic and GABAergic neurons.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2022
AuthorsAlmey A, Milner TA, Brake WG
JournalJ Comp Neurol
Date Published2022 Apr 09
ISSN1096-9861
Abstract

Estrogens affect dopamine-dependent diseases/behavior and have rapid effects on dopamine release and receptor availability in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Low levels of nuclear estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ are seen in the NAc, which cannot account for the rapid effects of estrogens in this region. G-protein coupled ER 1 (GPER1) is observed at low levels in the NAc shell, which also likely does not account for the array of estrogens' effects in this region. Prior studies demonstrated membrane-associated ERs in the dorsal striatum; these experiments extend those findings to the NAc core and shell. Single- and dual-immunolabeling electron microscopy determined whether ERα, ERβ, and GPER1 are at extranuclear sites in the NAc core and shell and whether ERα and GPER1 were localized to catecholaminergic or γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic) neurons. All three ERs are observed, almost exclusively, at extranuclear sites in the NAc, and similarly distributed in the core and shell. ERα, ERβ, and GPER1 are primarily in axons and axon terminals suggesting that estrogens affect transmission in the NAc via presynaptic mechanisms. About 10% of these receptors are found on glia. A small proportion of ERα and GPER1 are localized to catecholaminergic terminals, suggesting that binding at these ERs alters release of catecholamines, including dopamine. A larger proportion of ERα and GPER1 are localized to GABAergic dendrites and terminals, suggesting that estrogens alter GABAergic transmission to indirectly affect dopamine transmission in the NAc. Thus, the localization of ERs could account for the rapid effects of estrogen in the NAc.

DOI10.1002/cne.25320
Alternate JournalJ Comp Neurol
PubMed ID35397175
Grant ListDA008259 / / Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada (WGB) and NIH /
HL136520 (TAM) / / Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada (WGB) and NIH /