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Association Between Cirrhosis and Stroke in a Nationally Representative Cohort.

TitleAssociation Between Cirrhosis and Stroke in a Nationally Representative Cohort.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2017
AuthorsParikh NS, Navi BB, Schneider Y, Jesudian A, Kamel H
JournalJAMA Neurol
Volume74
Issue8
Pagination927-932
Date Published2017 Aug 01
ISSN2168-6157
KeywordsAged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, Female, Fibrosis, Humans, Male, Medicare, Risk Factors, Stroke, United States
Abstract

Importance: Cirrhosis is associated with hemorrhagic and thrombotic extrahepatic complications. The risk of cerebrovascular complications is less well understood.

Objective: To investigate the association between cirrhosis and various stroke types.

Design, Setting, and Participants: We performed a retrospective cohort study using inpatient and outpatient Medicare claims data from January 1, 2008, through December 31, 2014, for a random 5% sample of 1 618 059 Medicare beneficiaries older than 66 years.

Exposures: Cirrhosis, as defined by a validated diagnosis code algorithm.

Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was stroke, and secondary outcomes were ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, and subarachnoid hemorrhage as defined by validated diagnosis code algorithms.

Results: Among 1 618 059 beneficiaries, 15 586 patients (1.0%) had cirrhosis (mean [SD] age, 74.1 [6.9] years; 7263 [46.6%] female). During a mean (SD) of 4.3 (1.9) years of follow-up, 77 268 patients were hospitalized with a stroke. The incidence of stroke was 2.17% (95% CI, 1.99%-2.36%) per year in patients with cirrhosis and 1.11% (95% CI, 1.10%-1.11%) per year in patients without cirrhosis. After adjustment for demographic characteristics and stroke risk factors, patients with cirrhosis had a higher risk of stroke (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% CI, 1.3-1.5). The magnitude of association appeared to be higher for intracerebral hemorrhage (HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.5-2.4) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.7-3.5) than for ischemic stroke (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.5).

Conclusions and Relevance: In a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries, cirrhosis was associated with an increased risk of stroke, particularly hemorrhagic stroke. A potential explanation of these findings implicates the mixed coagulopathy observed in cirrhosis.

DOI10.1001/jamaneurol.2017.0923
Alternate JournalJAMA Neurol
PubMed ID28586894
PubMed Central IDPMC5710331